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How Third Party Insurance Works in an Accident

By: Tracy Whitelaw - Updated: 5 Dec 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Car Insurance Third Party Insurance

It's illegal in the UK to drive an uninsured vehicle. With motor accidents being extremely common, it makes sense to have a valid insurance policy in place, to cover not only yourself, but others with whom you may be involved in a collision. There are numerous types of insurance available, ranging from third party through to fully comprehensive, and it's important to know what type of insurance will cover you in a collision.

Accident Car Insurance

Accident car insurance is often known as third party insurance. This insurance works in a certain situation –
  • If you are an innocent accident victim, which means you weren't responsible at all for the accident, then you are considered a third party.
  • The driver of the vehicle who is responsible for the accident will then need to pay for any treatment you receive, with his or her third party insurance covering the costs.
  • Any driver who is responsible for an accident is unable to claim on their third party insurance policy for any injuries they sustain due to the collision as they are not the 'innocent accident victim (third party)

It is compulsory to have third party insurance as part of any other insurance policies you take out on your car. It is the minimum accident insurance policy that a driver can have and is generally the cheapest available.

Other Types of Insurance Policies

  • Third Party, Fire and Theft Insurance – This insurance policy not only covers you against any claims from an innocent accident victim, but also ensures that you're covered should your car be damaged in a fire, is stolen, or both. With the increase in car crime continuing to spiral, this is a very worthwhile addition to a basic Third Party insurance policy.
  • Fully Comprehensive Insurance – This is the most comprehensive insurance available and as such is usually the most expensive. It will cover the driver against any claims by accident victims as well as repairs, replacements and other issues with the car if it's damaged in a collision. With 'fully comp' insurance, you're covered even if you accidentally damage the car yourself, so it's well worth getting.

Who to Claim Against in an Accident

While it's extremely important to know how different types of insurance cover you in an accident, it's also important to know what to do if you're the accident victim and aren't at fault. In this case, you must always make a claim against the driver of the car who is at fault for any injuries you've incurred. Making the claim against the driver usually means it will be passed onto the individual's insurance company to deal with. If you can prove the other driver is at fault, then the insurance company will pay any costs due to you.

Non-Insured Drivers and Accidents

Although car insurance is a requirement by law in the UK, there are still some individuals who refuse to pay and put not only themselves, but others at risk. Don't worry if you're involved in an accident with someone who doesn't have insurance however ,as there are ways around this. You can speak to the Motor Insurance Bureau who will act as the insurance company for the uninsured driver. This means that you may be able to reclaim any out of pocket expenses, so long as you've followed the correct procedure, by reporting the accident to the police etc.

Ultimately, understanding what your insurance policy covers you for is an essential part of being a responsible driver. If you can afford to get fully comprehensive insurance then do so, but at the very least, always ensure you have third party, you never know when you might need it.

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gill - Your Question:
I've just been contacted by your organisation. It appears to me that I was fed a pack of lies about your official status in order to get me to make some kind of personal injury claim. My best guess is that you are just another of the ambulance-chasing companies attempting to make the most out of people's bad luck. The lass that was speaking to me first was quite charming and only doing her job but I was then passed onto Mark who became more aggressive than I would have liked. I've been assured that you will not ring me again and that my details have been removed from your system - including the password and National Insurance details that I gave. The one exception to this is that I would like a reply to this email apologising for the nuisance caused and stating that all personal details have indeed been removed. I await your response.

Our Response:
No you haven't been contacted by us. We don't contact anybody - this wesbite is here for advice. If you have been contacted by a company claiming to be us or giving our website address, please send all the details to jmarshall@pts.com and also report it to Trading Standards
TrafficAccidentAdvice - 16-Sep-16 @ 2:30 PM
I've just been contacted by your organisation. It appears to me that I was fed a pack of lies about your official status in order to get me to make some kind of personal injury claim. My best guess is that you are just another of the ambulance-chasing companies attempting to make the most out of people's bad luck. The lass that was speaking to me first was quite charming and only doing her job but I was then passed onto Mark who became more aggressive than I would have liked. I've been assured that you will not ring me again and that my details have been removed from your system - including the password and National Insurance details that I gave. The one exception to this is that I would like a reply to this email apologising for the nuisance caused and stating that all personal details have indeed been removed. I await your response.
gill - 15-Sep-16 @ 6:55 PM
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